Modern day minimalist living can be defined best by the quote “Live with Less” by an unknown blogger we assume lives in a very tidy one room apartment with a couple of pieces of furniture and one set of dishes they eat all of their meals in. The idea of cleansing ones life of clutter, of junk, of all of the things that sit around your house that you do not need or use on a day to day basis can be extremely liberating in a world where we are constantly bombarded with capital S “Stuff” on a constant basis.

When it comes to children however – where do we draw the line? As a parent, I constantly struggle with the balance between wanting my children to have access to tools and toys that will best prepare them for life – yet at the same time not to overload them with junk that they will use once and then sit in a closet somewhere gathering dust. They need to be comfortable with technology in a world that is more and more driven by it, yet at the same time not spend their life in front of a screen.

Photo by Robert Wright, New York Times

We believe the solution to this lies in what some call the “sharing economy”. In the sharing economy, we understand that there is a time and a place for “stuff”, but that does not mean we have to own it outright. Don’t use a car much? The sharing economy’s solution is Uber. Only going to watch a DVD once? The sharing economy’s solution is Netflix. Want a nice outfit you’ll only wear one night? You can always Rent the Runway. To date however, the sharing economy has typically ignored the needs of children.

STEMtrunk changes that. Like Netflix and Rent the Runway, STEMtrunk allows parents to choose an educational toy for a child, receive it in the mail, and let them play with it for as long as they are still receiving the educational benefit from it and it holds their interest. When they are done, instead of stuffing it into an already full closet and lamenting the fact that it cost you sometimes hundreds of dollars, you can send it back and expect the next toy to arrive in the mail shortly.

It is the perfect solution to the plight of the minimalist.¬†Instead of the overload of stimulation that has become many a child’s room – this one item at a time approach allows them the space to focus on the fun (but educational) task at hand, with hands-on kits that focus on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math skills.

STEMtrunk is launching Summer 2017 – and early subscribers will receive up to 30% off.